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Sample Word – Third Party Connectivity Guidelines

Posted in Application (380),Compliances (1300),Security (1500) by Guest on the March 28th, 2012
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Sample Word – TrueCrypt File Encryption Standard

Posted in Compliances (1300),Policies - Standards (600),Security (1500) by Guest on the March 28th, 2012
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Sample Visio – Certificate Life-Cycle Management (CLM)

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Sample Word – MSS Intrusion Detection System Standard

Posted in Compliances (1300),Policies - Standards (600),Security (1500) by Guest on the March 27th, 2012
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Sample Word – System Protection Monitoring Standard

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Sample Word – Secure Password Storage Standard

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Sample Word – Corporate Authentication Standard

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Sample Word – Secure Solaris Standard

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Sample Visio – Organized Java Layers

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Sample Word – Secure Java Coding Standard

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Oracle Server Performance Monitoring Considerations

The following Oracle Server 10g or higher counters that can be monitored as part an SLA:

  1. Number of active connections
  2. Buffer Cache Hit Ratio
  3. CPU Usage Per Second
  4. CPU Usage Per Transaction
  5. Current Logons Count
  6. Current Open Cursors Count
  7. Current OS Load
  8. Cursor Cache Hit Ratio.
  9. Database CPU Time Ratio
  10. Host CPU Utilization (Percentage)
  11. Disk Sort Per Second
  12. Disk Sort Per Transaction
  13. Global Cache Average CR Get Time
  14. Global Cache Average Current Get Time
  15. Global Cache Blocks Corrupted
  16. Global Cache Blocks Lost
  17. Hard Parse Count Per Second
  18. Hard Parse Count Per Transaction
  19. Logons Per Second
  20. Memory Sorts Ratio
  21. Network Traffic Volume Per Second
  22. Open Cursors Per Second
  23. Open Cursors Per Transaction
  24. Parse Failure Count Per Second
  25. Parse Failure Count Per Transaction
  26. PGA Cache Hit Percentage
  27. Physical Read IO Requests Per Second
  28. Physical Reads Direct Per Second
  29. Physical Write IO Requests Per Second
  30. Physical Write Total IO Requests Per Second
  31. Physical Writes Direct Per Second
  32. Physical Writes Per Second
  33. Process Limit Percentages
  34. PX downgraded Parallel Operation Per Second
  35. PX downgraded to serial Per Second
  36. PX downgraded percentage Per Second
  37. Recursive Calls Per Second
  38. Recursive Calls Per Transaction
  39. Redo Allocation Hit Ratio
  40. Session Limit Percentage
  41. Shared Pool Free Percentage
  42. Soft Parse Ratio

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Sample Visio – Solaris Disk States

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Sample Visio – Solaris Disk Diagnostics Flow

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US EMR Adoption Model

Posted in Application (380),Compliances (1300),Security (1500) by Guest on the March 23rd, 2012

Common knowledge that you should know.

Stage 0 All three ancillaries not installed
Stage 1 Ancillaries – Lab, Rad, Pharmacy – All installed
Stage 2 CDR, Controlled Medical Vocabulary, CDS, may have document imaging; HIE capable
Stage 3 Nursing / clinical documentation (flow sheets), CDSS (error checking), PACS available outside Radiology
Stage 4 Clinical Decision Support (clinical protocols)
Stage 5 Closed loop medication administration
Stage 6 Physician documentation (structured templates), full CDSS (variance & compliance), full R-PACS

  • Scalable functionality
  • Ease of use
  • Finger Biometric
  • Select applications
Stage 7 Complete EMR; CCD transactions to share data; Data warehousing; Data continuity with ED, ambulatory, OP
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Sample Visio – Apache Web Server Internals

Free Visio – Document downlaod

If you like this drawing… show your appreciation with a backlink or a comment.

Regards,

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Simple Excel – Backup Schedule Spreadsheet

Job Start and end time are approximate due to changes in file size

Day of the Week

Job Type

Jobs Run

Job Start and end Times

Job Name

Monday Differential (Data)

 

   
   
Tuesday Differential (Data)

 

   
   
Wednesday Differential (Data)

 

   
   
Thursday Differential (Data)

 

   
   
Friday Differential (Data)

 

   
   
Saturday Clean Tape Drives 

 

   
   
Saturday Full Backup (Data)

 

   
   
Sunday Full Backup (Data)      
   
Last WeekendOf the Month Full Backup System Archive

 

   
   

 

   

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Questions to Consider in Developing Backup Procedures

Posted in Application (380),Compliances (1300),O S (375),Security (1500) by Guest on the March 21st, 2012

Who

These are questions to consider when you are deciding who should be doing certain tasks:

  • Who determines what files and computers will be backed up, and how will the policy be published?
  • Who is responsible for doing the backup? Is this responsibility formally part of their job description?
  • To whom is the success or failure of the backup reported?
  • If the designated backup operator(s) are unavailable, who is the alternate?
  • How are users notified if the backup fails?
  • If the backup takes place unattended, but in a location that has off-shift personnel, are they trained to monitor the backup?
  • Should they intervene in case of failure?
  • Who do they notify of a problem?
  • What is the process they should follow?
  • Do they have some way to contact the responsible individual(s)?
  • Are these individuals required to be available by telephone or wear pagers?
  • If trained personnel are to monitor the backup, how are they scheduled for the next day?
  • Is there coverage for their other duties if there are problems with doing the backup, or they need to do a lengthy restore?
  • During vacations, sickness, or other absences, who will do the backup?
  • If a backup fails because of a hardware problem, who is the contact point with the vendor or manufacturer?
  • If the backup fails because of software problems, who do you contact? 

When

You also need to consider when and how often the backups should take place:

  • If you want to back up as many files as possible, the backup will probably occur after-hours. Will this be true only for full backups or all backups?
  • How often do you do full backups and incremental backups?
  • At what time should the backup occur, immediately after hours or before business hours early the next day?
  • If the backup fails because of hardware problems, is there standby hardware, or can a loaner be obtained from the vendor?
  • Will the vendor guarantee availability of a loaner?
  • How long will it take to replace the failed hardware?
  • Is the vendor’s technical support available at all times?
  • Is software technical support available at all times?
  • Do you have a configuration book that contains information about the computers running Windows Server that any technical support person might need?
  • If not, how long will it take to create this information when you have a problem?
  • What are the policies of the hardware or software vendor concerning fixes and how long they might take?
  • How long will it take to retrieve the backups or copies from a local or remote storage area?
  • Can the remote copies be obtained at any time or only during business hours?
  • How long will it take to do a full restore if the computer totally fails? 

Where

Where you do the backups and where you store the backup media are also important questions:

  • Is the backup taking place in a secure area?
  • If so, how is it monitored?
  • Where are the backup tapes stored?
  • Is the storage location secure?
  • Is it fireproof, waterproof, and otherwise protected from disasters?
  • Are the tapes that are stored on site accessible at all times to the people who might need them?
  • Are there copies, and where are they stored?
  • Is the offsite location secure?
  • Is it fireproof, waterproof, and otherwise protected from disasters?
  • Is it bonded?
  • Will the backup be done to a local tape drive, remotely over the LAN, or remotely over the WAN?
  • How is the connection verified before the backup begins?
  • How are computers equipped for power outages if operators are not present and backups are taking place? 

What

You need to decide what to back up:

  • What is the backup plan?
  • Are all modified files to be backed up, or will there be a policy regarding specific users, groups, departments, divisions, or company-critical files?
  • Will there be disks or volumes on the computer running Windows Server that are not backed up?
  • Will users be responsible for backup of their individual client systems?
  • Will there be a chargeback system for the amount of storage used? 

How

You also need to determine how you will do the backups and how to determine if backups work correctly:

  • How is the backup process certified?
  • Has every option that you expect to use been tested?
  • Do the scripts work?
  • Do the logs get created and are they correct?
  • If the path is long, the filename odd, the file size very large, or the number of files is large, does the backup still work? Can you restore files that have these chacteristics?
  • How is the backup started: from the command line, an icon, or by batch?
  • Do these methods all work the same?
  • If you schedule your backups, do they occur as scheduled?
  • Is the tape actually verifying the data?
  • Does a test restore work?
  • Does the system have to be in a certain condition before the backup starts?
  • What is the typical or expected state of the system before, during, and after the backup?
  • What is the actual condition?
  • Are there any unforeseen behaviors?
  • When you make changes to the operating system (such as installing a service pack), or the backup program, do you recertify the backup/restore process?
  • If you make hardware changes on the computer, such as installing a new controller or tape drive, or changing the BIOS on the motherboard, do you recertify the backup/restore process?
  • How do you certify that you can use your old tapes when you have changed hardware of software involved in the backup?

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Summary description of different OS Backup Types

Posted in Application (380),Compliances (1300),O S (375),Security (1500) by Guest on the March 21st, 2012

Full, Incremental, and Differential Backups:

Full Backup Advantages:

  • All files from the selected drives and folders are backed up to one backup set.
  •  In the event you need to restore files, they are easily restored from the single backup set. 

Disadvantages:

  • A full backup is more time consuming than other backup options.
  •  Full backups require more disk, tape, or network drive space. 

Incremental Backup:

  • An incremental backup provides a backup of files that have changed or are new since the last incremental backup. 

For the first incremental backup, all files in the file set are backed up (just as in a full backup). If you use the same file set to perform a incremental backup later, only the files that have changed are backed up. If you use the same file set for a third backup, only the files that have changed since the second backup are backed up, and so on.

In Backup you can select files and/or folders to be backed up. If you select a folder, all the files and folders within that folder are selected. In an incremental backup, if you select a folder, files that are added to the folder are included during the next backup. If you select specific files, files that are added to the folder are not included during the next backup. 

Example:

Monday – Perform the first incremental backup of selected files and / or folders using a file set with the Incremental option enabled.

Tuesday – Perform another backup with the backup file set you created Monday. Only files that have changed since Monday’s backup are backed up.

Wednesday – Perform another backup with the backup file set you created Monday. Only files that have changed since Tuesday’s incremental backup are backed up. 

Advantages:

  •  Backup time is faster than full backups.
  •  Incremental backups require less disk, tape, or network drive space.
  •  You can keep several versions of the same files on different backup sets. 

Disadvantages:

  •  In order to restore all the files, you must have all of the incremental backups available.
  •  It may take longer to restore a specific file since you must search more than one backup set to find the latest version of a file.

Differential Backup:

 A differential backup provides a backup of files that have changed since a full backup was performed. A differential backup typically saves only the files that are different or new since the last full backup, but this can vary in different backup programs. Together, a full backup and a differential backup include all the files on your computer, changed and unchanged. 

Example:

Monday – Perform a full backup and save the file set.

Tuesday – Perform a differential backup using the same file set. All files that have changed since the full backup are backed up in the differential backup.

Wednesday – Perform a differential backup using the same file set. All the files that have changed since Monday’s full backup are backed up. 

Advantages:

  • Differential backups require even less disk, tape, or network drive space than incremental backups.
  • Backup time is faster than full or incremental backups. 

Disadvantages:

  • Restoring all your files may take considerably longer since you may have to restore both the last differential and full backup.
  • Restoring an individual file may take longer since you have to locate the file on either the differential or full backup.

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Simple Script to Stop – Start MS Exchange Services (2000 – 2003)

Posted in Application (380),eMail (66) by Guest on the March 21st, 2012

In an emergency like, this might be useful to you for stopping / starting MS Exchange Services:

net stop MSExchangeMSMI /y

net stop MSExchangePCMTA /y

net stop MSExchangeFB /y

net stop MSExchangeDX /y

net stop MSExchangeIMC /y

net stop MSExchangeMTA /y

net stop MSExchangeIS /y

net stop MSExchangeDS /y

net stop MSExchangeSA /y

 To restart the Exchange Server services, type the following:

net start MSExchangeSA

net start MSExchangeDS

net start MSExchangeIS

net start MSExchangeMTA

net start MSExchangeIMC

net start MSExchangeDX

net start MSExchangeFB

net start MSExchangePCMTA

net start MSExchangeMSMI

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Sample Partial – Backup Tape Rotation Strategy

Posted in Application (380),Compliances (1300),Security (1500) by Guest on the March 21st, 2012

The following is based on the use of 10 tape for a backup rotation. This increases your daily file recovery length to ten days and increases your maximum recovery length to ten days.

Mon Tues Wed Thurs Fri
Tape 1 Tape 2 Tape 3 Tape 4 Tape5
         
Mon Tues Wed Thurs Fri
Tape 6 Tape 7 Tape 8 Tape 9 Tape 10

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This will also decreases the wear on the Monday through Thursday tapes. 

Grandfather/Father/Son

A second method, the Grandfather/Father/Son, works in much the same way with four rotating daily media. Each successive Friday uses a different backup media, three tapes for three successive Fridays. An additional three media set for three consecutive monthly backups is added to the rotation, this is the

 

Grandfather set.

The rotation strategy in its simplest form uses only 10 tapes. The daily tapes are reused each week. The three Friday tapes are rotated through the month and on the fourth Friday of the month one of the monthly (grandfather) tapes is used. This allows for a maximum possible recovery back to the third month, about 90 days after you have completed the full rotation and are one month into the second rotation. But the short-term daily backup is limited to only six days back.

 

However, by the end of the third month’s rotation you have now created an image of the end of five consecutive weeks (one of which is the monthly at the end of month two) and an additional monthly backup from the first month. This increases your ability to fail/fall back to a known good state in the event of an incident.

 

With these three extra monthly tapes you now have six good fall back points in addition to the four days of the week. 

 Mon

Tues

Wed

Thurs

Fri

Tape 1

Tape 2

Tape 3

Tape 4

Weekly 1

   
 
   

Mon

Tues

Wed

Thurs

Fri

Tape 1

Tape 2

Tape 3

Tape 4

Weekly 2

         

Mon

Tues

Wed

Thurs

Fri

Tape 1

Tape 2

Tape 3

Tape 4

Weekly 3

         

Mon

Tues

Wed

Thurs

Fri

Tape 1

Tape 2

Tape 3

Tape 4

Monthly 1

 

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Sample Partial – Disaster Recovery Plan

Posted in Application (380),Compliances (1300),Security (1500) by Guest on the March 21st, 2012

A disaster recovery plan consists of information and procedures required to make a rapid recovery from an occurrence which would disable Corporate Services for more than 24 hours such as a tornado, earthquake, fire, or act of sabotage or terrorism. 

Successful recovery of operations is dependent upon a complete set of specific written instructions for each department/area/center which address:

  • Completing and maintaining an up-to-date disaster recovery plan
  • Training personnel assigned to disaster recovery teams on various aspects of the plan
  • Storing and securing adequate backup materials off-site
  • Performing comprehensive tests of the plan
  • Modifying the plan as a result of the tests
  • Performing adequate cross-training to reduce reliance on key personnel
  • Safeguarding vital information 

Overall Objectives

The plan’s objective is to provide the information and procedures necessary to:

  1.  Respond to a disaster occurrence
  2.  Notify necessary personnel
  3.  Assemble disaster recovery teams
  4.  Secure alternative offices and equipment/supplies.
  5.  Recover data and information.
  6.  Resume processing to ensure minimal disruption to operations 

The high level plan is structured in an outline format. 

A team approach is used in the disaster recovery plan.  Each team’s activities form a separate section of this document.  The teams (and related sections) are the: 

  • Management Team
  •  Business Recovery Team
  •  Resource Recovery Team
  •  Technology Recovery Team

Each section details the procedures and specific responsibilities of its team.  Each section is also formatted to be used on a stand-alone basis if only one area of Corporate Services is affected by an event. 

Recovery Levels

Management has assessed the impact of a disaster on functional areas on Corporate Services and classified that impact using the following disaster levels:

 Level 0

No interruption in operations

 

Level 1

Some facility and/or computer equipment damage, but operations can be resumed within eight hours

 

Level 2

Moderate damage to the facility and/or the computer equipment, but operations can be resumed within eight to 24 hours 

Level 3

Major facility and/or computer equipment damage, with interruption in operations for over 24 hours.  All functions and personnel should be moved to an alternate site(s) 

Testing

Realistic testing of the plan on a periodic basis is critical.  Reasons for testing the plan include:

  • Determining the feasibility of the disaster recovery process
  • Verifying the compatibility of backup facilities
  • Identifying deficiencies in the existing procedures
  • Identifying areas that need modification or enhancement
  • Providing training to team managers and team members
  • Proving the ability for Corporate Services ability to recover from any event
  • Providing a mechanism for maintaining and updating the disaster recovery plan

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Sample – Disaster Recovery Record Salvage Procedures

Posted in Application (380),Compliances (1300),Security (1500),Web Services (250) by Guest on the March 21st, 2012

If a disaster strikes and records are damaged, knowing the correct salvage procedures can minimize lost data.  Magnetic, photographic and paper media can require different techniques.  The chart on the following pages indicates the appropriate initial and follow-up action for each media.  Prompt restorative action can minimize or prevent permanent damage to critical and possibly irreplaceable credit union records.

Salvage Techniques by Type of Record Media 

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Sample Excel – Budget Template spreadsheet

Posted in Sample - IT Spreadsheets - PowerPoints (251) by Guest on the March 21st, 2012
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Hardening Enterprise Apache Installations

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Apache Benchmark For Unix (Apache) Weblink

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