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Windows Anti Viruses; Firewall Services – Stopping

Posted in Firewalls (75),Security (1500) by Guest on the May 10th, 2011

Stop Service list of Antiviruses & Firewalls:

net stop _Avp32.exe
net stop _Avpcc.exe
net stop _Avpm.exe
net stop Ackwin32.exe
net stop Agnitum Outpost Firewall
net stop Anti-Trojan.exe
net stop ANTIVIR
net stop Apvxdwin.exe
net stop ATRACK
net stop Autodown.exe
net stop AVCONSOL
net stop Avconsol.exe
net stop Ave32.exe
net stop Avgctrl.exe
net stop Avkserv.exe
net stop Avnt.exe
net stop Avp.exe
net stop AVP.EXE
net stop AVP32
net stop Avp32.exe
net stop Avpcc.exe
net stop Avpdos32.exe
net stop Avpm.exe
net stop Avptc32.exe
net stop Avpupd.exe
net stop Avsched32.exe
net stop AVSync Manager
net stop AVSYNMGR
net stop Avwin95.exe
net stop Avwupd32.exe
net stop Blackd.exe
net stop BLACKICE
net stop BlackICE Defender
net stop Blackice.exe
net stop CA Sessionwall-3
net stop Cfiadmin.exe
net stop Cfiaudit.exe
net stop CFINET
net stop Cfinet.exe
net stop CFINET32
net stop Cfinet32.exe
net stop Claw95.exe
net stop Claw95cf.exe
net stop Cleaner.exe
net stop Cleaner3.exe
net stop Defwatch
net stop Defwatch.exe
net stop Dvp95.exe
net stop Dvp95_0.exe
net stop Ecengine.exe
net stop eSafe Protect Desktop
net stop Esafe.exe
net stop Espwatch.exe
net stop eTrust EZ Firewall
net stop F-Agnt95.exe
net stop Findviru.exe
net stop Fprot.exe
net stop F-Prot.exe
net stop F-PROT95
net stop F-Prot95.exe
net stop FP-WIN
net stop Fp-Win.exe
net stop Freedom 2
net stop Frw.exe
net stop F-STOPW
net stop F-Stopw.exe
net stop GNAT Box Lite
net stop IAMAPP
net stop Iamapp.exe
net stop Iamserv.exe
net stop Ibmasn.exe
net stop Ibmavsp.exe
net stop Icload95.exe
net stop Icloadnt.exe
net stop ICMON
net stop Icmon.exe
net stop Icsupp95.exe
net stop Icsuppnt.exe
net stop Iface.exe
net stop Internet Alert 99
net stop IOMON98
net stop Iomon98.exe
net stop Jedi.exe
net stop LOCKDOWN2000
net stop Lockdown2000.exe
net stop Look’n’Stop
net stop Look’n’Stop Lite
net stop Lookout.exe
net stop LUALL
net stop Luall.exe
net stop LUCOMSERVER
net stop MCAFEE
net stop McAfee Firewall
net stop McAfee Internet Guard Dog Pro
net stop Moolive.exe
net stop Mpftray.exe
net stop N32scanw.exe
net stop NAVAPSVC
net stop NAVAPW32
net stop Navapw32.exe
net stop NAVLU32
net stop Navlu32.exe
net stop Navnt.exe
net stop NAVRUNR
net stop NAVW32
net stop Navw32.exe
net stop NAVWNT
net stop Navwnt.exe
net stop NeoWatch
net stop NISSERV
net stop NISUM
net stop Nisum.exe
net stop NMAIN
net stop Nmain.exe
net stop Norman Personal Firewall
net stop Normist.exe
net stop NORTON
net stop Norton AntiVirus Server
net stop Norton Internet Security
net stop Norton Personal Firewall 2001
net stop Nupgrade.exe
net stop NVC95
net stop Nvc95.exe
net stop Outpost.exe
net stop Padmin.exe
net stop Pavcl.exe
net stop Pavsched.exe
net stop Pavw.exe
net stop Pc firewall
net stop PC Viper
net stop PCCIOMON
net stop PCCMAIN
net stop PCCWIN98
net stop Pccwin98.exe
net stop Pcfwallicon.exe
net stop Persfw.exe
net stop PGP Gauntlet
net stop POP3TRAP
net stop Proxy +
net stop PVIEW95
net stop Rav7.exe
net stop Rav7win.exe
net stop Rescue.exe
net stop RESCUE32
net stop SAFEWEB
net stop Safeweb.exe
net stop Scan32.exe
net stop Scan95.exe
net stop Scanpm.exe
net stop Scrscan.exe
net stop Serv95.exe
net stop Smc.exe
net stop SMCSERVICE
net stop Snort – Win32 GUI
net stop Snort (Intrusion Detection System)
net stop Sphinx.exe
net stop Sphinxwall
net stop Sweep95.exe
net stop Sybergen Secure Desktop
net stop Sybergen SyGate
net stop SYMPROXYSVC
net stop Tbscan.exe
net stop Tca.exe
net stop Tds2-98.exe
net stop Tds2-Nt.exe
net stop TermiNET
net stop TGB:BOB
net stop Tiny Personal Firewall
net stop Vet95.exe
net stop Vettray.exe
net stop Vscan40.exe
net stop Vsecomr.exe
net stop VSHWIN32
net stop Vshwin32.exe
net stop VSSTAT
net stop Vsstat.exe
net stop WEBSCANX
net stop Webscanx.exe
net stop WEBTRAP
net stop Wfindv32.exe
net stop Wingate
net stop WinProxy
net stop WinRoute
net stop WyvernWorks Firewall
net stop Zonealarm
net stop Zonealarm.exe
net stop AVP32
net stop LOCKDOWN2000
net stop AVP.EXE
net stop CFINET32
net stop CFINET
net stop ICMON
net stop SAFEWEB
net stop WEBSCANX
net stop ANTIVIR
net stop MCAFEE
net stop NORTON
net stop NVC95
net stop FP-WIN
net stop IOMON98
net stop PCCWIN98
net stop F-PROT95
net stop F-STOPW
net stop PVIEW95
net stop NAVWNT
net stop NAVRUNR
net stop NAVLU32
net stop NAVAPSVC
net stop NISUM
net stop SYMPROXYSVC
net stop RESCUE32
net stop NISSERV
net stop ATRACK
net stop IAMAPP
net stop LUCOMSERVER
net stop LUALL
net stop NMAIN
net stop NAVW32
net stop NAVAPW32
net stop VSSTAT
net stop VSHWIN32
net stop AVSYNMGR
net stop AVCONSOL
net stop WEBTRAP
net stop POP3TRAP
net stop PCCMAIN
net stop PCCIOMON

 

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Simple Visio – Blackberry (BES) Interaction

Posted in eMail (66),Visio Samples - Stencils (457) by Guest on the May 9th, 2011
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Sample Word – Project Risk Factors Checklist

Posted in Projects (400) by Guest on the May 8th, 2011
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Sample Word – Project Risk Factors Checklist

Posted in Projects (400) by Guest on the May 7th, 2011
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Java Security

 

Is Java secure?

Nothing in life is completely secure; Java is no exception. Several specific security problems have been discovered and fixed since Java was first released. If you’re using an up-to-date Web browser, you are usually safe against the known attacks. However, nobody is safe against attacks that haven’t been discovered yet.
 If somebody says Java is safe because “hackers aren’t smart enough to exploit the problems,” don’t believe them. We’re disappointed that some people who should know better are still spouting this nonsense. We’ve discovered several security problems, and we’re pretty sure we’re not the smartest people in the world. If one group of hackers creates a Java-based attack and shares it with their friends, we’re all in trouble.
 

Other Web “scripting” tools such as JavaScript, Visual Basic Script, or ActiveX face the same sorts of problems as Java. “Plug-in” mechanisms provide no security protection. If you install a plug-in, you’re trusting that plug-in to be harmless.
 

What are the risks?
There are two classes of security problems: nuisances and security breaches. A nuisance attack merely prevents you from getting your work done – for example it may cause your computer to crash. Security breaches are more serious: your files could be deleted, your private data could be read, or a virus could infect your machine.
 If you are the victim of a security breach, any data stored on your machine may be read or corrupted by a bad guy. If you’ve got important company secrets on your computer, maybe you should surf the net on another machine.
 

In the not-too-distant future, your computer may be able to digitally sign documents that are legally binding, just like your paper signature. Your computer may also be able to spend your money. In a world like that, security becomes even more important than it is right now.

How common are security breaches?
So far, there have been no publicly reported, confirmed cases of security breaches involving Java, though there have been some suspicious events that might possibly have involved Java security problems. Of course, the lack of reported cases is no guarantee that there haven’t been breaches that either weren’t discovered or weren’t reported. But it does indicate that breaches are rare.
Who is at risk?
You’re at risk if you’re running a Java-enabled browser and you visit a Web page written by a person you don’t know or don’t trust. Since the two most common browsers, Netscape Navigator and Microsoft Internet Explorer, are Java-enabled, most people surfing the Web are at risk.

 

How can I protect myself?

If you maintain sensitive data on your computer that you think an unscrupulous adversary might want, you should disable Java and JavaScript, as well as not installing plug-ins, except from well-known vendors.
 If you don’t disable Java or JavaScript, think twice before visiting a Web site belonging to a person you don’t know or don’t trust. Of course, some people will be perfectly happy just living with the risk.
You can reduce the damage caused by a potential security breach by taking common-sense precautions like backing up your data frequently and keeping sensitive data off your Web-surfing machine.
 
What about products that claim to detect malicious applets?
 
We are skeptical about these products. They probably can’t hurt, but don’t let yourself get a false sense of security from using them.
 
What about products that claim to block Java applets at a firewall?
Recent research by David Martin, S. Rajagopalan, and Avi Rubin suggests that it is extremely difficult, if not impossible, to do this, so we suspect that these products can be bypassed by sophisticated attackers.
If you want to block Java, the best way to do it is by setting your browser preferences to disable Java.
How can I restrict which sites my browser will accept applets from?
 
We are about to release a prototype tool that lets you do this.
 
Won’t digital signatures solve all of the problems?
No, they’ll only help a little. Digital signatures let you know who wrote an applet, but they don’t help you decide whether you can trust the author.
 
Is this problem ever going to go away?
No. Security will always be an issue with any network software. As long as vendors are racing their products out the door and adding new functionality with each and every release, you can expect security bugs will always exist. Writing crash-proof software is hard. Writing secure software is even harder.
Which is more secure: Java or ActiveX?
This is a complicated question with no simple answer, so we wrote a separate FAQ about it.
Which is more secure: Netscape Navigator or Microsoft Internet Explorer?
In our judgment, the latest versions of the two browsers offer roughly comparable levels of security.
 
Which version of my browser should I use?
Generally, the latest version is the safest. Be sure to regularly check your browser vendor’s Web pages for announcements of new versions. Look carefully – the announcements are not always prominent.

 

What about “hostile applets?”

This is a general term for Java applets (programs) that exploit security bugs. There are some pages on the Web that demonstrate, with appropriate warning messages, some hostile applets. The applets we’ve seen are nuisance attacks rather than damaging attacks.
I run a Web server. Am I at
risk?
 
Not directly. But watch out for some newer servers that support “servlets”. Servlets are fine if they are all written by the people running the server site; using servlets in this way is probably better than using CGI scripts. Going beyond this to let clients upload Java servlets into your server is very risky.
 Of course, you should be careful about which Java applets appear on your server. Unless you wrote the applet yourself, you don’t necessarily know what it’s doing. If you copy somebody else’s applet, it could possibly be a trojan horse – doing something useful as well as being malicious.
What about JavaScript?
 
Java and JavaScript, despite the similarity of their names, are not related. (Isn’t marketing wonderful?) JavaScript has its own security problems, so you may also want to disable JavaScript.

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Sample Excel – ERP Core Requirements spreadsheet

Posted in Application,Business (600),Compliances (1300) by Guest on the May 2nd, 2011
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