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We are still here… just really busy

Posted in Visio Samples - Stencils (457) by Administrator on the August 2nd, 2017
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Configuring the Syslog Service on VMware

Posted in Virtual - VMWare (30) by Guest on the July 30th, 2017

All ESX and ESXi hosts run a syslog service (syslogd), which logs messages from the VMkernel and other system components to a file.

To configure syslog for an ESX host:

Neither vSphere Client nor vicfg-syslog can be used to configure syslog behavior for an ESX host. To configure syslog for an ESX host, you must edit the /etc/syslog.conf file. 

To configure syslog for an ESXi host:

On ESXi hosts, you can use the vSphere Client or the vSphere CLI command vicfg-syslog to configure the following options:

  • Log file path: Specifies a datastore path to the file syslogd logs all messages.

  • Remote host: Specifies a remote host to which syslog messages are forwarded. In order to receive the forwarded syslog messages, your remote host must have a syslog service installed.

  • Remote port: Specifies the port used by the remote host to receive syslog messages.

To configure syslog using vSphere CLI command:

For more information on vicfg-syslog, refer the vSphere Command-Line Interface Installation and Reference Guide.

To configure syslog using vSphere Client:

  1. In the vSphere Client inventory, click on the host.

  2. Click the Configuration tab.

  3. Click Advanced Settings under Software.

  4. Select Syslog in the tree control.

  5. In the Syslog.Local.DatastorePath text box, enter the datastore path to the file where syslog will log messages. If no path is specified, the default path is /var/log/messages.

The datastore path format is [<datastorename>] </path/to/file> where the path is relative to the root of the volume backing the datastore.

Example: The datastore path [storage1] var/log/messages maps to the path / vmfs/volumes/storage1/var/log/messages.

  1. In the Syslog.Remote.Hostname text box, enter the name of the remote host where syslog data will be forwarded. If no value is specified, no data is forwarded.

  2. In the Syslog.Remote.Port text box, enter the port on the remote host where syslog data will be forwarded. By default Syslog.Remote.Port is set to 514, the default UDP port used by syslog. Changes to Syslog.Remote.Port only take effect if Syslog.Remote.Hostname is configured.

  3. Click OK.

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Sample – Word – Disaster Recovery Contingency Organization

Posted in Business (600) by Guest on the September 9th, 2016

Word – Disaster Recovery Contingency Organization

Disaster_Recovery_Contingency_Organization.doc

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Sample – Word – Insurance Policy Inventory

Posted in Business (600) by Guest on the August 8th, 2016

Word – Insurance Policy Inventory

Insurance_Policy_Inventory.doc

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Sample – Word Clinical – Role Based Access Actors and Key Use Cases

Posted in Business (600),O S (375),Security (1500) by Guest on the August 7th, 2016
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Sample – Unix – Nightly backup script

Posted in Data Center - SOC - NOC,O S (375) by Guest on the June 28th, 2016

Unix – Nightly backup script

For the nightly backup, UNIX’s find has an option to identify files newer than a named file.
(Tar has a newer than date option but the format doesn’t seem to be documented and I’ve never
found the right format.) I created a zero byte root only readable /etc/installed with a time stamp
just after the end of the last Linux install. A similar marker file could be used following a full
backup which could be done instead of the postinstall tar but this would take a lot more media.

#
#
# Anyone may use or modify this code for any purpose PROVIDED
# that as long as it is recognizably derived from this code,
# that this copyright notice, remains intact and unchanged.
# No warrantees of any kind are expressed or implied.
#
# Most of the time tar is run with the -r, append, option but the
# tar file must first be created before this can be used. Any small
# file in a known location will do hence /etc/shells.
cd /var/local/backup
tar -cvf backup /etc/shells >backup.log
/usr/bin/find /bin -type f -newer /etc/installed -exec tar -rvf backup {} \; >>backup.log
/usr/bin/find /etc -type f -newer /etc/installed -exec tar -rvf backup {} \; >>backup.log
/usr/bin/find /home -type f -newer /etc/installed -exec tar -rvf backup {} \; >>backup.log
/usr/bin/find /lib -type f -newer /etc/installed -exec tar -rvf backup {} \; >>backup.log
/usr/bin/find /root -type f -newer /etc/installed -exec tar -rvf backup {} \; >>backup.log
/usr/bin/find /usr -type f -newer /etc/installed -exec tar -rvf backup {} \; >>backup.log
/usr/bin/find /sbin -type f -newer /etc/installed -exec tar -rvf backup {} \; >>backup.log
/usr/bin/find /var/db -type f -newer /etc/installed -exec tar -rvf backup {} \; >>backup.log
/usr/bin/find /var/gdm -type f -newer /etc/installed -exec tar -rvf backup {} \; >>backup.log
/usr/bin/find /var/lib -type f -newer /etc/installed -exec tar -rvf backup {} \; >>backup.log
/usr/bin/find /var/local/downloads -type f -newer /etc/installed -exec tar -rvf backup {} \; >>backup.log
/usr/bin/find /var/local/logs -type f -newer /etc/installed -exec tar -rvf backup {} \; >>backup.log
/usr/bin/find /var/log -type f -newer /etc/installed -exec tar -rvf backup {} \; >>backup.log
/usr/bin/find /var/named -type f -newer /etc/installed -exec tar -rvf backup {} \; >>backup.log
/usr/bin/find /var/nis -type f -newer /etc/installed -exec tar -rvf backup {} \; >>backup.log
/usr/bin/find /var/preserve -type f -newer /etc/installed -exec tar -rvf backup {} \; >>backup.log
/usr/bin/find /var/state -type f -newer /etc/installed -exec tar -rvf backup {} \; >>backup.log
/usr/bin/find /var/yp -type f -newer /etc/installed -exec tar -rvf backup {} \; >>backup.log

chgrp wheel backup*
chmod 640 backup*
mv backup `date +%y%m%d`.tar
gzip `date +%y%m%d`.tar
mv backup.log `date +%y%m%d`.log

. /usr/local/bin/backup_to_other

 

Sample only – Always verify scripts run on your systems

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